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Friday, April 1, 2011

Out of the Kiln this morning


A typical firing



Tiles, bowls plates and then some, all fit into one firing.







Intentional flaws created with wax resist to give more character.







Pyrometric cones are used to check temperature during firing.  Cones are programmed for precise temperatures.  I fire to cone 06 which should reach to about 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.  The unused cone (on far left) is placed into the kiln during the firing process.  The cone in the middle shows that my kiln is firing too hot.  The shape of the cone on the right is perfect.  I made the adjustment before firing by changing the firing schedule to cone 07. 





Everything fired perfectly.

Come for a visit and I will show you how.

Gina




16 comments:

  1. Gina, I would have a hard time choosing from your firing because I like different tiles for different reasons - the Botticelli face, the beautiful peacock and the chevron borders. But I'm especially partial to the spotted rabbit because I once owned a spotted Rex rabbit - a wonderful pet. Thanks for sharing!

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  2. I like the character flaws. Sometimes it's hard to "add" them. Gina, do you ever have goof-ups that just don't fire up correctly at all?

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  3. Hi Mark, Isn't it amazing how certain pets steal our hearts? Do you have a picture of your spotted Rex rabbit?

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  4. Dear Mermaid, Thank you so much for your comment and welcome to my blog. It's nice to see you here.

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  5. Dear Ann, Interesting question. I have taken a hammer to only one item, a plate. A second firing usually takes care of an undesired affect. I like to experiment and sometimes they don't turn out and sometimes I have learned something new.

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  6. Beautiful as always! I am currently trying out some new wax resist to get my cuerda seca lines. We shall see how it turns out. Sometimes I get frustrated with all the testing I have to do before starting a project...but, according to my father in law, that is art!! Patience is not usually one of my virtues :(
    Thamks for sharing your creations!!

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  7. I was lost in the technicalities somewhere after 'pyrometric cones', but I do seriously love your creations!

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  8. Hi Barbara, I have been experimenting with eyebrow pencils, the oily kind (Revlon). Gives more control and oddly enough, the brown does NOT burn off. Thought you might want to try.

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  9. Hi Karen, I know it sounds technical but isn't. It's a way to test my kiln to see if it reaches the correct temperature at the end of the firing process. As kilns get older they need a little adjustment.

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  10. Your work is so good Gina! I am still trying to find space for more of it!

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  11. Dear Theresa, You are so sweet. Thank you for the compliment. Hope you have lots of fun on your trip and please, take lots of pictures.

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  12. Hi Gina,
    How did you ever think of trying eyebrow pencils???? Amazing that they work. I should check it out. Hopefully they come in black :) Thanks for the tip! Amazing!!

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  13. Dear Barbara, I don't know if the eyebrow pencil is good enough for your cuerda seca lines. I do know that I have better control over the outcome with a pencil. I am always experimenting. My Professor in Italy showed me that one can use a permanent marker...I haven't tried it.

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  14. Gina, Your work is so beautiful and you are truly a talented lady. Thank you for joining my Open House party.
    xo,
    Sherry

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