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Saturday, June 30, 2012

Rosemary likes Morning Glories





So do we.



Especially the Dwarf Morning Glory (Convolvulus, Ensign mixed)) seen on the right.  Perfect for ground covers and containers.  Available in pinks, reds and blues from Thompson and Morgan.






The Morning Glory we don't like is pictured in the top right and lower left.  It is the ordinary morning glory, also known as bindweed,  despised by everyone because if left unchecked will choke out even grass and has no problem growing through cement.  

But we like Rosemary's Morning Glory.
http://wherefivevalleysmeet.blogspot.com/
And have a look at Rosemary's Dracunulus Vulgaris plant blooming.  Rosemary promises that it only smells terrible for 24 hours. 

Happy weekend my dear Blogging Friends.

Gina


6 comments:

  1. Dear Gina - I am pleased that we all like Morning Glories and have sorted out the differences.
    I love that little dwarf blue one, and saw it for the first time when we visited Hidcote gardens a couple of weeks ago. I put one on my collage from the visit. I vowed then that we would grow it next year. It is such a vibrant little flower. It is amazing how the convolvulus family can be so different. The Bindweed being such a difficult weed to remove, and the ones I am growing up the wall being so delicate to get started.

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  2. Dear Gina - One has to laugh or cry at the weed that grows through cement, especially when the grass next to it chooses to die!

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  3. HELLO GINA

    Your garden has some beautiful flowers. It is a pity bindweed is so invasive. It is rather pretty

    Helen

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  4. Dear Rosemary, I start my Dwarf Morning Glories in a plastic bag (same as Sweet Peas)inside my house. When they have sprouted it is time to plant them into the soil.
    Once you have grown the large variety they usually reseed themselves every year. To make sure they don't get hit by a late frost I also collect seeds in the Fall. Mine show up in large quantities and it is quite easy to transplant them into pots and along trelisses. I always plant a few into urns...they look wonderful when they begin trailing.

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  5. Dear Mark. You have to admire the little pest for being so reliient.
    Great post you published this morning. Amazing what lovely works of art exist everywhere.

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  6. Hello Helen, If bidweed didn't strangle everything else it would be quite welcome because I also like the little pink and white flowers. I even like Dandelions, not liked by anyone else.

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