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Friday, May 29, 2015

Abandoned



Only a very short walk from my house

an old farmstead has lost its owner.







Only a few months ago cattle were fed from this big haystack.







A bachelor farmer lived here.






Look at the size of this saw blade.








He said he didn't need a wife 
"because he had a woman (that's me) running through his fields every day" 






Will someone take over this farm? 
Probably not.  Farming is hard and has few rewards. 







This fertilizer spreader shows how many years it has been dragged through the fields...it has picked up bailing twine that will never come off.  
And the water tank will never be moved to a pasture.  






 The Danes knew how to build fine cabins.  Cabins which have stood straight and proud for more than a hundred years. 





This one probably built by the same family.  






The granary is still full of barley.








It takes a lot of equipment to run a farm. 







There is order in a forgotten corner.






He will not leave his owner's house.  

I have known  him since he was a puppy, now he barks at me.  





Not to worry, a neighbor is taking care of him.  His brother has already moved over. 


Have a great weekend dear Friends, 

Gina 



18 comments:

  1. So sad but wonderful photos. As a farmers daughter I can imagine the life of a bachelor farmer. Here it seems an ordered chaos with a lonely dog......

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    1. Hello Janneke, I am hopining that someone will take over the farmstead. It is in a beautiful location with fantastic views all around.
      Thank you for your visit. It is so appreciated.

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  2. Really sad that the dog is waiting for his master to come home...
    Great photos, as always, Gina.

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    1. Hello Marigene, The dog has it all figured out. He goes back and forth between houses to visit with the neighbor's children and to be fed. He has done that for some time...even before his master past on. ..maybe he knew.

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  3. What a sad story - and the poor old dog feeling abandoned - beautiful pictures of the farm and all its workings.

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    1. Hello Elaine, Yes the story is sad. However, in this particular case he seems to be adjusting well. His brother has already moved permanently over to the house next door. No doubt he will follow.

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  4. What a poignant posting, Gina! I agree with you that the dog has probabbly been very aware of the owner's aging and illness, and perhaps even senses more than we do. I really like the texture of that wall with all the pulleys and wrenches! Each one of them looks like a great collector's item.

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    1. Dear Mark, At least three generations contributed to that wall. What stories they could tell. I recall the farmer coming to our old farm, about 25 years ago, asking for a contribution to his wall.

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  5. Gina, I am glad that I waited to take a look at this post until I really had the time to try to fully appreciate all that you've shown us.

    Your photographs is as beautiful as ever, and in this case becomes an eloquent expression of what farming on one's own on a traditional family farm in 2015 actually is made of. Your discretion in not revealing too much about how this current state evolved for the farmer, the farm and that grieving dog is admirable. My curiosity as a stranger is not admirable.

    Yes, it would be grand if the farm's potential will be recognized by someone who has the vision, energy and talent to carry on. I hope that you will keep us posted of any developments.

    Your photographs of this particular story deserve publication, perhaps in some sort of diary or calendar that would even benefit some farm philanthropy. You know I live in a big city, and so perhaps I have got this all wrong. xo

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    1. Dear Frances, The two of us live in totally different environments. That is what makes life so interesting. We can enjoy and admire our respective environments. There is a reason why we live where we do. As an Immigrant I value the opportunities my adopted country has given me. And one of the most precious gifts is that I can live in peace in an environment that I have chosen.

      Thank you for your thoughtful message Frances.

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    2. So sad. My heart melts when I see an old homestead, especially one which is now abandoned and had such a long and rich history I pray that someone who respects and appreciates such things will resume the farm. There is so much love and life that went into each piece or picture that I see of the farm, from the long-standing log home to the various tools hung neatly in order on the wall. It speaks of someone's whole life devoted to the passion of farming. We all can be truly feel blessed by those who spent a life time in hard work to feed and nourish others.

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    3. Hello Marsha, It is the farmer and his family that I admire. The work is hard and never ending. I see so many young people going for different goals. Working from eight to five is much easier. You said it best.

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  6. Dear Gina,
    The stillness at this farm is so tangible in your photos. They also create an expectation for someone to show up to add another gadget to the collection, pad the waiting dog on the head and wave at the woman who is running through his fields. Sad but great post.
    Warmest greetings from Texas, where the sun has come out again, Sieglinde

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    1. Dear Sieglinde, Finally, after weeks of rain you are again seeing sunshine. I know how much you like to be in your garden.
      Running through the Alfalfa fields is an art. One has to be mindful about not damaging the hard earned crop.

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  7. I really like your photos - very rustic, especially the one with the old tas tank :-)

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  8. Thank you for stopping by Amy. Thank you also for your very nice compliment.

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  9. I am so glad I found your blog. A grand read. You had me at ox ear hair.

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  10. Hello Patty, You must have found one of my older posts wherein I featured the paint brushes I use for painting ceramics. Thank you for visiting and thank you also for taking the time to comment. It is very much appreciated.

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