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Thursday, September 8, 2016

What to do



I know what to do with our Apples


Many varieties growing in our garden. 








I know what to do with our plums and pears.







I know what to do with our winter grapes





I know what to do with Greens from our garden.





I know what to do with sour cherries from our garden.





and red beets from our garden.






I know what to do with our peaches.






and our cabbages and eggplants.





I know what to do with our apricots






and with our onions.


But I don't know 

what to do with our Asian Pears. 

My tree is laden with fruit.

They are sweet and crunchy, great for salads.  







But they are not good for baking.  

Preserves are good enough, just not great. 

Should I buy a dehydrator? 
Have you tried to dry them, I haven't. 






Do you have a favorite recipe or idea.  

Would you share?  




 


Have a great remainder of the week dear friends,

Gina 


32 comments:

  1. Dear Gina, each and every one of these photographs is a beauty but the combination of the deep purple plums and golden pears is spectacularly lush.

    I have now experience with Asian pears, so can give you no advice. I will try to find at least one of them to taste test for myself during this splendid season.

    It is so wonderful to have peaches and apples ripening at the same time. xo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Frances,
      You will be very surprised when you taste your first Asian Pear. The flavor is like no other. They are best when they have turned slightly yellow from green. They have a lot of moisture in them, which is good for eating when fresh but doesn't work too well when trying to use them in baking recipes.
      I would like to know what you think of them.

      Delete
  2. Don't forget to eat each and every one of your beautiful fruits and vegetables,
    especially the asian pears. Gorgeous still-life photography.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Rick. Fruits are such easy and willing subjects. Thank you for stopping by.

      Delete
  3. Such wonderful photographs and glorious fruit. I have never had an Asian pear, but would be interested to try one.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Annie,
      Next time you see an Asian Pear make sure you give it a try. They are very juicy and delicious.
      Thank you for stopping by.

      Delete
  4. Everything looks gorgeous! I've never had Asian Pears to deal with Gina so am of no help here!

    Off soon - hope I find some lovely fruits, and veggies, in Kenya!
    Hugs - Mary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Mary, There will be new and unusual fruit and vegetable choices where you are going. How exciting. I look forward to your your photos.

      Delete
  5. I have seen Asian Pears but never bought them as they always feel rather hard in comparison with other pears - the the colour in your photos is wonderful

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    Replies
    1. Dear Rosemary, Asian Pears do feel unfriendly to the touch because their texture is more like and apple, but different. They are truly delicious. They have just the right amount of sweetness and their crunch is what makes them so special. Next time you see them in your Grocer, give them a try.
      Mine come right off the tree and I can pick them when they have turned slightly yellow from green. That is when they are best.

      Delete
  6. My advice on what to do with your Asian pears is "sell them". They cost a king's ransom in the markets. I've never seen more beautiful produce anywhere. You must have a staff of gardeners. If you do all that yourselves, I'd buy your book if you'd write one. You've truly mastered the raising of fruits and vegetables.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Patsy and welcome. You brought a smile to my face. We don't have gardeners. Fruit trees are easy to grow and not every year is as bountiful as this year. We share with neighbors and friends.
      As I'm writing this, a pot of Asian Pears is sitting on the stove to make into sauce like applesauce. I don't know if it will work.
      My neighbor has a food dehydrator. He is going to see if Asian Pears dry well. They would be a wonderful snack in the winter.
      I have written a book. A book with lots of photographs of my hand painted ceramics. You can click on the book at the right and top of my blog. I twill take you to a few photos within.

      Delete
  7. Wow you have a lot of produce! I'd think a dehydrator would be invaluable for all your other fruit and veg even if it doesn't work out with the asian pears.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hello Tricky,
    A friend brought a dehydrator by yesterday. I will try the Asian Pears today. I see that you are an expert in dehydrating. One of my friends dries the most unusual fruits and vegetables...even Siberian Kale (of which I have rows and rows). It was actually delicious.
    Thank you for your suggestion.

    ReplyDelete
  9. One year I had a TON of pears to can, so I just canned them and we would have them for a side dish now and then. Well, that got tiring, so I would take those canned pears, and put them in an apple pie along with apples. Always more apples than pears, but that used up some of those pears I canned. No one ever knew. I also used a recipe for apple sauce, but I made 'pear sauce'. And the best was the brandied pears. YUM! We had those for Christmas dinner and they were delish. Hope some of that helped.

    Cindy Bee

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Cindy, All very good ideas and I appreciate your help. I have just finished drying some of my Asian pears in a food dehydrator. Their flavor is better than regular pears, very intense and delicious. I will dry more of them this week.
      Thank you for stopping by and leaving such a helpful comment.

      Delete
  10. What a beautiful post! Filled with nature's bounty. Your images are so pretty. I can't help with the pears ... I just eat them! :)
    Happy Monday!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Snap, Good for you, just eat them. I try to do the same but sometimes there are so many something has to be done.

      Delete
  11. You have quite a bounty of harvest from your gardens Gina. I have been lucky enough to find Damson plums at our farmers' market and have made a couple of apple/plum pies which are delicious!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Judith, I will have to remember your combination of apple/plum pies. Only another week and both will be ripe in my garden.

      Delete
  12. You sure have some beautiful fruits and veggies to enjoy! I'm not sure. I guess I would slice one on top of my oatmeal. Or eat slices warmed and topped with ice cream. Can you freeze some for later? Maybe we can all stop by your house and you can hand them out! heehee! Hugs!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Lavender Dreamer, You can certainly stop by and pick to your hearts content. In the meantime I am drying them and was surprised how delicious they are when dried.

      Delete
  13. Your photos are so lovely, and I am so envious of all of your bounty! My father-in-law has an Asian pear tree, and I use them every year just as I would any other variety, to preserve canned pears, fruit cocktail, pear preserves, pears in red hot (cinnamon) sauce, pear jelly, etc. The only thing I do differently is add a couples of tablespoons of lemon juice to whatever I am canning. I read years ago to do this with Asian pears if preserving them because they lack the acidity other varieties have.
    Pear butter, pear pie filling, pear juice... I could go on and on!
    Good Luck,
    Tammy Parker

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Tammy and thank you for your visit. You have some very good and very unusual suggestions. It is obvious that you know what you are talking about. I will have to try at least 2 or 3 of your ideas. I also believe in adding fresh lemon juice to most of my canning. It helps retain color and flavor.

      Delete
  14. Gina, once again your amazing photographs of the produce that you harvest from your garden have left me stunned. how blessed you are. Thank you for sharing the bounty with the Mosaic Monday crowd this week.
    Maggie.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Maggie, I am so pleased that you like my photos. Wish I could share my bounty with all of my blogging friends.

      Delete
  15. Wow, your photos are just stunning. Every image is just gorgeous. I am so impressed that you know what to do with your fruits and veggies but I don't have a suggestion for the pears. Thanks for sharing your pics and information.

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    Replies
    1. Hello Judy, You can't go wrong with pictures of fruits, vegetables and flowers. They are always such willing subjects. Thank you for your lovely compliment.

      Delete
  16. What an amazing harvest you've had. I've eaten Asian Pears, and would think that treating them like apples (sauce) or pears (canning?) would work. I see from your comments that dehydrating them has been successful. You'll enjoy them throughout the winter.

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    Replies
    1. Hello Lorie, Asian Pears are just different enough that regular recipes don't work. That is why I'm in such a dilemma. They have a high moisture content that they make everything watery. Pies end up being a watery mess.
      The best thing to do is eating them right off the tree. They are amazing when eaten fresh. I have been sharing them with neighbors and friends. Most have not eaten an Asian Pear and the feedback I get is always the same. Wow!

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  17. I so love your shares Gina, always so beautiful in vibrancy of colours and always such talent revealed, even in knowing what your plans are to do with the things you so often share...homegrown fruits and veggies, homemade canned goods, must be such a feeling of accomplishment, ah the fruits of your labor abound. I am thinking that the neighbors across the lane from me also have those kinds of pears and they are very hard...the White-tailed Deer enjoy them for sure. She makes a jam from them, but really cooks the fruit down long, before finishing them down into jam. It turns out a bit too sweet for my taste, as she adds sugar to sweeten the tartness of them. Thank you for stopping by my blog. Take care~

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Mary, Asian Pears are round. It's the shape that distinguishes them from regular pears. Asian Pears are a cross between an apple and a pear. A very successful pairing. Winter Pears are very hard. So it is possible that your neighbor uses winter pears in her recipes. Pears are such royal fruits that it is a pity that they don't hold up well.
      Thank you for stopping by and I hope that you are feeling better.

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