Google+ Followers

I HAVE NOT GIVEN YOU PERMISSION TO COPY OR PUBLISH MY PHOTOGRAPHS

Please be aware that I do not wish to have my photographs published , pinned or repinned on Pinterest.

copyright notice

Sunday, September 29, 2013

Cavolo Laciniato




Soup's on


The garden is overflowing with produce.





Onions drying on top of wall. 





Gathering ingredients for Cavolo Soup,
Leeks, potatoes, spices, herbs and Cavolo Luciniato.
Cavolo, the only Kale grown in Tuscany, also known as black Kale.
Best when harvested after a light frost...brings out the sweetness.    







Cavolo Kale is very high in Beta Carotene, rich in Calcium, Vitamin K and Vitamin C.  Lowers cholesterol, decreases absorption of dietary fat and boosts DNA in cells.  
And, most importantly, it contains sulforaphane, a chemical with potent anti cancer properties.  

When driving through Italy you will see small "Palm Trees" in every garden.  Cavolo is harvested by plucking the leaves from the bottom on up.  

Thank you for visiting and next year, grow a row of Cavolo.

Have a wonderful  week. 

Gina 




29 comments:

  1. Dear Gina,

    It's good to know all the benificial properties of kale. I've always enjoyed a ceasar salad made with Romaine lettuce, but I understand after all these years that the Romaine has very few nutrients. All the more reason to appreciate your suggestions!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Dear Mark, Yes but what would Ceasar Salad be without Romaine lettuce? Do you like Anchovies in your salad?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorry to disappoint, but I'm not fond of anchovies! Or any of the hot peppers.

      Delete
  3. Oh to have such a garden! You have taken wonderful images of your produce!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Podso and thank you for your visit and thank you also for leaving a comment.

      Delete
  4. The kale sounds wonderful. You do have a beautiful garden and wonderful produce! The soup sounds delicious! Lovely images, have a happy week ahead!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Eileen, And the same to you. Kale is a wonderful vegetable. It survives many repeated frosts which makes it even more valuable.

      Delete
  5. Hi Gina,

    So nice to meet you!

    We are practically neighbours; I live on the island of Crete and your beautiful autumn bounty looks very similar to what we are harvesting in my neck of the woods, (or should I say, olive groves, vineyards and vegetable patches!). Such bright and bold colours, gorgeous, and lifesavers, to boot!

    Poppy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Poppy, Thank you so much for becoming a follower. Your beautiful photography caught my eye. I wish that we were neighbors so that I wouldn't have to put up with the very cold weather that is coming our way.

      Delete
  6. I grow kale, but not the black kind. Next year I'll try that. It looks lovely.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Lorrie, For many years I noticed this particular kale in Italian gardens. Now that I know more about it I will make sure to grow it next year. It is not difficult to grow and will last many months into winter, even in Zone 5.

      Delete
  7. You always manage to make everything look so beautiful and your food images as much as anything else, are like little teasers, and I find myself leaving a comment and begin to be hungry for what you have shared...your shares are enticing ;)~

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Mary, What a lovely compliment you have given me. At least Kale soup is good for you. We know how to eat well but sometimes my sweet tooth gets the better of me.

      Delete
  8. Gina, I love the looks of your sunlit harvest of delicious vegetables.

    Kale featured on my childhood supper plate, and was the one vegetable (perhaps the only food) that I could not bear to eat. That cringing dislike continued to cling to me for many decades...actually jumped over the century wall. And then, I tried a recipe given by a blogging friend that involved kale, potatoes, onions, butter, cream...and bacon. It was so good (and apparently also good for me) that I have now declared a kale truce.

    I've made a note of Cavolo kale and will ask the farmers at the big Union Square greenmarket if any of them carry it. If so, I will try it and report to you. If not, I will encourage them to plant some, and buy whatever variety they do have.

    Many thanks. xo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Frances, At least you were not so determined never to try kale again. Your recipe sounds great. I would like to give it a try. Will you post it for us, please.
      I grow several varieties of kale, especially the curly kale type. I like to make sure that I have plenty of greens for my chickens, especially in the winter months. They say that the darker the vegetables, the better they are for you. And so it is with this particular Kale.

      Delete
    2. Gina, my breakthrough Kale experience came via a recipe from the brilliant 15 January 2013 post titled Conquering Kale, posted by the very inspiring Sue whose site may be found at thequincetree65.blogspot.com

      I recommend frequent visits to Sue's place. You will be delighted by her ideas, humor, fabulous photos and cooking inspiration.

      Now...off to the farmers market. xo

      Delete
    3. Thank you Frances, you're right, I will be visiting your friend often.

      Delete
  9. It looks like you are having a bountiful harvest. We love kale but don't have a garden any more. There's nothing like fresh veggies! Enjoy!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Lavender Dreamer, So true. We are lucky to have the space to have a large garden. It is a lot of work but the rewards are many. Thank you for your visit and your comment.

      Delete
  10. Cavolo Soup sounds like the perfect meal for Autumn.
    Wonderful produce - those fat aubergines will be delicious.
    An inspiring post - thank you.
    Hugs
    Shane

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Shane, Thank you for your visit and thank you also for leaving a comment. The soup was good and like you have said, perfect for this time of year. We had a big frost a couple of nights ago and my eggplants froze. I picked them just in time the night before. They hold up well if you rub them with a little olive oil.

      Delete
  11. Dear Gina - we love Cavolo Nero - as we call it. I didn't know of its nutrient qualities but suspected that it must be very rich in vitamins and irons by its rich colour. When we have it as a side vegetable I always save the water, rich green, to add to stocks, soups and casseroles.
    Lovely collages.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Rosemary, You are such a wise cook. I also save water from cooked vegetables, when preparing stuffed peppers or cabbage rolls or whatever greens I am preparing. Besides soup stock I often reserve the liquid for gravies. This is the first year I have tried growing Cavolo Nero and I am so pleased that it germinated so well and is so easy to grow.

      Delete
  12. This is a gorgeous peek into your life. I love the idea of fresh farm products and the soup sounds yummy. Your photos are always stunning! Have a great week!

    Pam

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Tea in Texas, Thank you for your very nice compliment. We do enjoy the produce from our garden even though it's a lot of work this time of year. But, it is worth it.

      Delete
  13. What great photos, Gina...my favorite is the one with onions in the foreground and cattle in the background. I do like the one with the red sunflowers, too.
    Have a wonderful week.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Marigene, I can tell that you are a country girl. How nice of you to stop by and leave such a lovely comment. It is so appreciated.

      Delete
  14. I really like these mosaics featuring vegetblaes and flowers. Very nice.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Thank you CameraGirl. I am so pleased that you like my collage.

    ReplyDelete