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Sunday, February 1, 2015

Helleborus



A couple of weeks ago I dug through the frozen ground 


















to lift a little Hellebore seedling.




 I must admit it didn't look like much.




But here it is. New growth, how wonderful!
In a few weeks it might even bloom.  





It did last year. 






I wonder what color my little pot of Helleborus will be this year?





In Europe one can purchase Hellebore as cut flowers and in little pots.  

I have seen them blooming en masse in the Black Forest at Christmas time.  No wonder they are called Lenten Rose. 






They are such a welcome and pretty sight at Christmas and in January 

Has anyone seen them potted up in this country?  


Have a great Superbowl Sunday my dear friends. 

I hope that YOUR team wins. 

Gina 



26 comments:

  1. I am often envious of what you are able to grow Gina. These are lovely and I know it will flourish under your hand.

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    1. Dear Theresa, Hellebore are very forgiving. I'm growing this little plant by the kitchen window and it is thriving. Later and when it has bloomed (which it will do for weeks) I will either give it to a friend or plant it in a new spot in my garden.

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  2. What a good idea Gina - I know that you are always keen to see them again at this time of year. The little plant looks very happy and is developing well. Helleborus are such a joy with their lovely selection of colours, and the bonus is that they last such a long time.

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    1. Dear Rosemary, I must blame you. Everything you say about Helleborus is true. Your Helleborus have been blooming in your garden since January. I will not see mine for another month, at least. I am also so jealous of the many Helleborus plants I remember seeing in window boxes in January while visiting London in December a few years ago.

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  3. They are pretty flowers, I would welcome them in my yard.. Lovely post, enjoy your new week ahead!

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    1. Hello Eileene, I don't know what climate you live in. Once you own one Helleborus plant you will soon have many more. They reseed quite readily and even colors will change with each new plant. Why not give them a try. They are not difficult to find.

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  4. Dear Gina,
    What a lovely close-up of a Hellebore in your first photo. I am always intrigued by the mysterious interior of some flowers. I wonder if the plate in picture 5 is finished. It looks quite nice in its simplicity without gold.
    Warm greetings, Sieglinde

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    1. Dear Sieglinde, Helleborus would do well in your garden. They don't mind a little shade. If you like, I will send you a little plant later in the Spring.
      The Platter in picture 5 is finished. I often paint in the grisaille style. I like the simplicity of painting in shades of grey or shades of burnt umber. I will send you a few more pictures of ceramics I have painted in that particular style.

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  5. You created a dazzling display of hellebores in the mosaic, some pretty colour combinations - and a little shout out for daffodils too! I don't think we sell hellebores as cut flowers here, I'll have to explore this possibility.
    Thank you for linking to Mosaic Monday Gina.

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    1. Hello Judith, You have a keen eye to have noticed the daffodils. Thank you for hosting Mosaic Monday. Have a great week.

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  6. Gina, a few specialty florists here in NYC do carry potted hellebores around this time of the year. I always look forward to seeing them appear over in Central Park, where there a great variety seem to thrive year after year.

    Your own "flock" are gorgeous...what colors...with a delicate, almost iridescent effect. xo

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    1. Dear Frances, That makes me happy that you have seen Helleborus in pots in New York. I would love to know if anyone else has seen them being sold in the U.S. It is one of the plants that can easily be transplanted into the garden or large perennial pots for the terrace.

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  7. Hello dear Gina
    I love this plant Hellebores. I am going to see if I can find it to plant here.
    You have so many.. they are lovely.
    xxx val

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    1. Welcome back dear Valerie. Wish I could send you a few of mine to try in your beautiful garden. I see that your roses are beginning to bloom again. Lucky you.

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  8. I am really enjoying your beautiful images of the hellebores and the mosaics too. So lovely.

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    1. Hello Ingemarie and thank you for stopping by and leaving such a very nice comment. Have a wonderful week ahead.

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  9. I never thought of potting up one of my hellebores but will add that to the list for next year.

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    1. Hello Donna, It is not too late to dig up a little plant this year. Helleborus are very hardy..Tthey don't mind being transplanted when they are very young.
      Thank you for your visit.

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  10. Dear Gina,

    Your Hellebore looks like delicate pocelain when it's in bloom, and how great that Mother Nature spreads blooms throughout the year! Now I want to know about the interesting ceramic in the third photograph! You've hidden something in plain sight that is doubtlessly worthy of its own posting!

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    1. Dear Mark, so like you to "see" the details. The ceramic piece you see is a Holy Water Font or Aquasantiere. It is a small decorative version which I brought from Italy a few years ago.
      The real thing and much larger version is usually located at the entrance of a church. It contains holy water which has been blessed. It is customary to sprinkle oneself upon entering the church.

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  11. Hellebores are such delicate yet hardy plants. They are a welcome sight around here these days, graceful nodding flowers on long stems. Your plant is beautiful.

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    1. Hello Lorrie, Are you saying that Helleborus are already blooming in your area? You are so right, the plant is delicate yet very hardy and if that wasn't enough, they reseed themselves readily.

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  12. That plant is a survivor! Beautiful a d your collage is wonderfully made!

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    1. Hello Sallie and welcome. Thank you for stopping by and thank you for leaving such a nice comment.

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  13. I just went out shopping for hellebores last weekend, with high hopes of bringing home some dark purple ones for the woodland side of the yard. The nursery wanted $20 for a one gallon plant ~ argh. I ended up bringing one home from a different nursery but it is a lighter shade of purple than I was hoping for and it was still spendy at $12. They loved to be divided and that is what I'll have to do if I want a proper hellebore garden that is affordable.

    Thank you for your visit to my blog. It is much appreciated. I replied to your comment on my blog but I wanted to let you know we are aware of the endangered status of frogs. We love to go down and look but I have told the kids we are not going to pester them by trying to catch them and so on. I have been down there twice to clean up a bit of debris that I can see from our home, only to find a ton of junk hiding down there. It is a lot of work, especially since I don't own it, I just live right next to it. So I am really surprised there are so many frogs. I saw six out sunbathing the other day and it is so cute to hear their croaks from the back porch.

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  14. Dear Stacy, $20 is a lot of money for a plant. This is what I would do: Wait until it blooms to make sure that it is the color you like. If it is, then buy it. Let it finish blooming and let the seeds ripen. The seeds will plant themselves. You will have hundreds of little seedlings which you can transplant wherever you like. The colors might be different from the mother plant because the bees are always so busy pollinating. But all plants will be beautiful.

    Your children will have such a great time watching the little pollywogs with their long tails emerge in the Spring from the large group of egg sacks. Then later they start looking like little frogs as they lose their tails.

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