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Tuesday, February 9, 2010

A Life Story Assignment



My dear Readers, here is week 4 homework assignment - BYW

Every Day Life Stories on the Farm

My blog is only 6 months old and I recently celebrated my 100th post.



We really are not Farmers. That doesn't mean that we don't "farm" our land, growing every vegetable and fruit that is willing to survive in this short growing season. We live at 6,000 feet in a charming and historic town of 500 inhabitants.



This is the time of year when little lambs are being born. Recently, a good friend and sheep Rancher asked us if we could lend a helping hand. His son was getting married in the big city and his yews were giving birth. Our assignment was to make sure that every yew, who showed signs of birthing, would be brought into the large shed where fresh straw and fresh water for drinking (yews drink more than a gallon of water after giving birth) was waiting for them.



There were hundreds of yews. We watched carefully but sometimes they would give birth so quickly that the little lamb would end up outside, in the cold. We would quickly pick up the little one and, naturally, the yew would follow, often giving birth to another lamb, once inside. After a little while we would put mother and offspring into a separate holding pen where they were warm and happy.



Some yews needed help birthing. Some yews did not like their offspring. One yew tried to kill her second lamb by forcing it against the cement wall. We had to take all three and put them into a holding pen. We tied the yew by her neck and one foot to only allow limited movement. This way the little lambs could nurse. As soon as their mother's milk is digested and leaves their little bodies, yews will readily accept those lambs they initially rejected.



Now and then some lambs will never be accepted and some mothers will die in the birthing process. These little lambs become "Bummers". I have raised quite a few of them. There was one quite special Bummer, his name was George and here is his story, one of my first blogs.

http://ginaceramics.blogspot.com/2009/08/bummer_06.html
Gina


12 comments:

  1. that story about George was so sweet! thank you for sharing :)

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  2. Wow, what an experience - what an interesting, out of the ordinary "everyday" life.

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  3. yes, really out of the ordinary life...thanks for sharing...oh, so real and alive...;)...

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  4. Tracy, Holly, Lisa and Ines, come for a visit and we will put you to work on our non working farm. Champagne is always on ice.

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  5. Love the picture and the story! I have a soft spot for lambs and remember bottle feeding some as a youngster on my aunt's farm. Strangely I don't like sheep though. Not sure why, just find them a bit creepy.

    Congrats on 100 posts in 6 months - that's a great milestone! :)

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  6. Aww... I wish I was there right now. I'm not a big animal person, but I love watching them.

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  7. Awww, the story of George is so sweet. It's so interesting to catch a glimpse of a life that is so different to what I'm used to, thanks for sharing!

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  8. Dear animal lovers, we have so many animals, domestic and wild, around here, they try to sneak in behind us, through the front door and into the house.

    Gina

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  9. What a fascinating life you have, so different compared to mine. Your story of little George is charming. Your art is absolutely gorgeous, what a wonderfully talented person you are!

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  10. Hi Mitzi, how nice of you to comment. I thank you for your very generous compliment. You are correct when you say that there is room for more than one antiques store in one area. More interesting when they are all bunched together. I love your blog, so full of great ideas and images.

    Gina

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