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Thursday, July 21, 2011

Oops!




It happens




During firing it cracked right down the middle.
So, I applied a temporary antiquing jell to make it look old.
Now the crack almost looks like a tree.



I painted another tile.  This one also broke. 
The Tile Setter dropped it while installing it in the kitchen of one of my clients.

I think that this tile is not meant to be. 

None of us are perfect!

Gina



20 comments:

  1. You are so correct. Not one of us is perfect, but ... isn't it a shame when something we create in hopes of its perfection ... does not quite make it across the finish line.

    I do love your solution to that crack!

    Cheers.

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  2. I LOVE it!! It looks more antiquiy! (You know what I mean.) I think it's wonderful just the way it is. Now I need you to explain antiquing jell to me. I'm sure we covered it, but I don't remember. Like paint?

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  3. I like the design of your new antique — it has the look of a 17th century tapestry.

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  4. Hi Frances, Welcome. In ceramics it is either Christmas or Halloween. One has to get over failures in a hurry. Thank you for stopping by.

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  5. Hi Jacki, I also like it the way it is. This way I get to keep it. Many pieces coming from Italy now have some sort of antiquing applied. Mostly accomplished by adding furniture stain or India Ink after firing. It is not permanent and will wash off to the shock of the purchaser. A better solution is to apply antiquing with the dregs (water obtained from cleaning brushes) and apply it BEFORE firing. It is then permanent.

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  6. Hi Mark, It is seldom that I have failures...but they do happen. I have no idea why it cracked. Often, it is because of a weak spot that was created during the making of the tile. It is not apparent when I paint it, so it always comes as a shock when I open the kiln. I was taught, by my Father, to destroy everything that is not perfect. But with ceramics you can always use broken pieces for a mosaic.

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  7. Sigh....so nice of you to share some imperfections! I sometimes think I will never live up to your standards...but now, I know you are human! LOL!

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  8. Dear Gina, when I took art lessons years ago in Cape Town my teacher used to say there is no such thing as a mistake. I love how your rescue of the first tile turned it into something else of beauty.
    And thank you for your kind comments on my blog. Yes, I am looking at these wonderful Portuguese tiles with new eyes now, thanks to following your blog!

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  9. I like the "crack" a lot... due to your expertise!

    And Pieter loved his Lion tile! It will be taking a prominent position in our kitchen. Thanks so much, Gina!

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  10. Gina this is beautiful! I am so sorry it broke. :( Thanks for linking it up at Home Sweet Home!
    Sherry

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  11. Hi Ann, I'm delighted that Peter likes his lion tile. Peter did a fine job in helping you identify a series of strange looking greens. He deserves the prize.
    Gina

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  12. Dear Theresa, In ceramic painting one always has be ready to accept failures...and I have had a few. Actually, I don't mind them, I learn from each mistake.
    One failure was a difficult one to accept. I had spent 2 days of intensive painting in Deruta, Italy and took the large tile home with me to fire in my kiln. Only portions of it fired and the rest of the painting disappeared.

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  13. Dear Karen, Your recent posts of Portugal are a feast for the eyes. I can't get enough of them. Hoping for more.

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  14. Hi Ann, A crack is only serious when it is one tile out of many, as in, when I paint a mural. It is difficult to match the exact coloration...every firing is different.

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  15. Hi Sherry, When I open my kiln I never know what to expect. Failures do happen and as time passes, I'm always ready to start all over again.

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  16. What a lovely scene. And I agree that the crack in the first tile looks like an "intentional" element of the design. Great way to save the piece.

    Thanks for linking to the party. I would love to have you join me each week. Come by tonight to see yourself featured. By the way, I just joined you as a follower. ;)

    Liz @ the Brambleberry Cottage
    http://thebrambleberrycottage.blogspot.com/

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  17. I can so appreciate you struggle with ceramics...I am a rank amateur and it is the most difficult medium. Everything I try to make seems to be problematic, a la my most recent blog post on a wall plaque I made. Your work is amazing...do you fire things at in a low fire kiln? The class I take is very resticted as to materials and techniques; it is fustrating.

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  18. Hi Liz, Thank you so much for the FEATURE. How sweet of you to include me and also thank you for the invitation to join your party.
    Warm regards, Gina

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  19. Hi La Vie, I LOVE your wall plaque. It is beautiful. I fire most of my ceramics to cone 06 or about 1800 degrees. Don't give up. Keep trying. It is so rewarding when something comes out of the kiln and it is a little masterpiece.
    And maybe one of these days you can come for a visit and we can share ideas.

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  20. Oh, this is a gorgeous tile. What a sad thing. I have to say though, the look of your broken tile makes me think of a cherished antique. It would make me smile every time I saw it.

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