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Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Have you tasted Redmond Sea Salt?

Salt that is actually good for you!


Redmond Salt is found in a large vein 400 feet below the surface, where the air is sweet and cool, in the small town of  Redmond, south central Utah.






Redmond Salt is marketed under the name of "Real Salt",
by Redmond Heritage Farms, LLC.





Images from the Redmond Salt Museum

An ancient sea covered North America. Over millions of years the waters of this sea evaporated leaving the salt in undisturbed deposits.






During the Jurassic period,  volcanoes erupted around the sea beds, sealing the salt with thick layers of volcanic ash, protecting the salt deposits from pollution "that man would eventually introduce into the environment".





See the large pink rock?  It is a block of salt, just as it is mined, beneficial to animals because of its rich mineral content.







Redmond Salt is unrefined, without additives, chemicals or heat processing. The dark flecks you see represent a full compliment of trace minerals. 








There are several grades of Redmond Salt,  all found within the same mine, but at different locations within the mine.  The salt is taken as found and ground, that's it. 







Some of the mined salt is not table salt.  It is used on highways to melt the ice for safer driving. 
















Redmond Salt is shipped all over the world and is easily available. 







Or you can drive by my house and I will point to the road to Redmond, Utah.






by Ann Torrence Photography
And after our visit to Redmond Salt we can go to the Country Auction in Salina and have a bowl of chili at the auction cafe.
But only if its Tuesday.
Of course, while there, you can always buy a handsome herd of Black Angus.

Have a great week my dear Blogging Friends.

16 comments:

  1. Dear Friends, Yes we did, paving the way but left the auction part for us to do when you come down on a Tuesday.

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  2. Yep, we are on a strict diet that requires this salt and I hate salt, but love this.

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  3. So interesting....I love sea salt! Nothing like cooking without it....hope alls well!

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  4. Hi, Gina - Do you cook with this salt, and if so, is there a noticeable difference in taste between it and regular (Morton) salt?

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  5. Dear Gina,
    This is such an interesting blog. I have learnt something about Utah Redmond salt.
    Here in Portugal, our salt comes from the salt sea beds in the south..
    I use sea salt only..just a little as i am not too much of a salt person.
    Great photos..
    Enjoyed reading this.. how super that you can have a chilli dish at the auctions..
    Have a good 1st of march.
    val

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  6. Hi Terry, Redmond Real Salt is endowed with a wealth of natural minerals and nothing has been added...no wonder that it is recommended by health experts.

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  7. Dear Tina, Because Redmond salt is mined from deep within the earth it is pure and free from pollutants. Wherein other sea salt beds are exposed to modern man's activities. If you love the taste of sea salt you will love Redmond Salt even more.
    Yes, all is well here, only 6 inches of new snow this morning...but very pretty.

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  8. Dear Mark, There is a world of difference in the taste of Redmond Salt vs Morton Salt. Most chefs use this salt for flavoring at the end of preparing a dish. Redmond Salt is mined and then crushed. Nothing else. Try both salts on your finger and you will notice a stark chemical flavor in Morton Salt. Redmond Real Salt is praised by chefs world over.

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  9. Dear Val, You are right, most of us should watch our salt intake. That is why I appreciate this special salt. I love sprinkling just a little over my vegetables or meats. And there is nothing more delicious than a sun ripened tomatoe from my garden sprinkled with these little grains of salt. I call them bursts of flavor.

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  10. What an interesting post this is, Gina. Once again, you've taught me something new!

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  11. Dear Frances, So glad you liked this post. Redmond Salt is easily purchased from the Internet. It is available in many different sizes. I prefer their coarsely ground salt but use the regular grain for general cooking.

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  12. Gina, what a great informative post! thank you for this because stupidly I'm always boasting about French Salt of Guérandes or "fleur de sel", so from now on, i'll tell all my foodie friends about this salt. I'm not too sure I can find it here in Spain but i'm going to Paris in April and i'll be sure to look it up at the Grande Épicerie du Bon Marché. Love the auction ambiance !

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  13. Dear Lala, I will try and find a source for you somewhere in Europe. It really is superior salt. Of course that is because it has never seen daylight before it was mined.
    Auctions are a lot of fun, especially here out in the West, where handsome cowboys rule.

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  14. Hello Gina, This is fantastic! I'll have to look this up! Thank you so much for sharing and as always - your photos are fantastic! Thank you for sharing with Home and Garden Thursday,
    Kathy

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  15. Hi Kathy, You are always so sweet to compliment me on my photos. Hope you try the Redmond Salt. It is supposed to be really good for you, I guess because of all the minerals it contains.

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