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Sunday, May 4, 2014

Did we dodge the bullet?



Four nights of below freezing. 



Looks like they all survived, apples, pears, cherries, plums, peaches and apricots. 






The kitchen garden has been planted with leeks, cabbages and onions. 
Vegetable seeds are ready to go in. 
carrots, beets, collards, Swiss chard, basil, coriander, 
corn sald/mache, gourmet blend lettuce, romaine,  spinach, beans,
fennel, cavolo laciniato, arugula, curly kale, turnips, eggplants and artichokes. 







By August it will have provided many meals for us, our friends and even our chickens. 







There will be flower gardens.






There will be tomatoes ripening in the sun. 






 And fruit for winter months. 










Squash and Zucchini for winter baking.







But only if the water holds out. The Old timers say that if Horseshoe Mountain still has snow caps by the 24th of July, we will have enough water. 






But just in case, our spring flows at 39 gallons per minute. 
Plenty of water for cattle and gardens. 


Wishing you a Happy Spring day.

Thank you for stopping by.  
You have made my day! 

Gina 



http://dearlittleredhouse.blogspot.com/2014/05/mosaic-monday-moss-and-flowers.html

http://betweennapsontheporch.net/




14 comments:

  1. Dear Gina,

    I'm glad you've "weathered" the worst part. I don't know if I mentioned it before, but here in Florida, the orange growers spray their oranges with water during a freeze, and the ice coating resulting from the spraying actually insulates the crop. It all sounds very counter-intuitive, but it works!

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    1. Dear Mark, I have heard that spraying with water helps. It hasn't worked for us in the past. So far so good this year...but we are not out of the woods yet. We still expect to get late freezes.

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  2. Dear Gina,
    I wonder if Horseshoe Mountain normally still wears snow caps in July. It certainly makes for a great view, but so does everything around your home. After our unusually cold winter it is hard to imagine that you still have to worry about frost, but I am so glad everything survived. Here in Texas a nice cool breeze can be felt in the mornings, but by afternoon it is already 90 F and water restrictions are in place.
    Wishing you a happy week, Sieglinde

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    1. Dear Sieglinde, I wouldn't mind temperatures in the nineties. It takes such a long time to get vegetables, flowers and fruit to mature in this high mountain desert. The nights are very cold and days will soon be very hot. A strange place to garden. But somehow we manage.

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  3. Beautiful photos. Happy gardening...

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    1. Thank you Patricia. Thank you also for your visit and happy gardening to you.

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  4. Dear Gina - I am always surprised to see that although your spring begins so much later than we do, you catch us up. Your apple blossom is already at the same stage as ours. This year we have lots so we are hopeful that we will enjoy a good crop as I am sure you will too. Lovely rich photos.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Rosemary for the sweet compliment. We are not out of the woods yet. Often, we get a late frost in June. But it is all worth it, especially today when the sun is shining brightly and the birds are singing with gusto.

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  5. Hi Gina,

    You live in a wonderland of little miracles! Can't wait for your summer garden, but until then, so happy your little fruit blossoms are safe; they're so delightfully pretty and their scent must be the sweetest!

    Visiting via Mosaic Monday,

    Poppy

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    1. Dear Poppy, I always enjoy reading your special blog.posts, so many lovely photos and your blog so beautifully written. Thank you for your visit.

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  6. Interesting to read of your water situation, including the folklore of the old-timers. A wonderful big vegetable garden, wishing you a good growing season.

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    1. Dear Judith, Thank you for your good wishes. We do enjoy gardening even though we get many setbacks. If it isn't a late frost then some secret creatures are nibbling during the night on everything I have planted the day before,

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  7. Wishing you a lovely Spring day as well. What beauty abounds near you and all of the veggies and fruits, all so fresh and wonderful. I think it is just a beautiful place where you live, magical~

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    1. Dear Mary, Thank you so much for your visit and sweet comment. We do enjoy living in the country. Like you, we enjoy nature and we enjoy having a piece of land that we can work and appreciate.

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