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Saturday, July 19, 2014

Mon Bouquet du Jour





Mein Sonntagstrauss am Sonnabend.





Hollyhocks make long lasting cut flowers if you know this trick.







You singe their stems over a hot flame.







Same for Poppies.

I singe the stems over my cook top burners, holding several stems at one time.  

Protect the fragile flower heads by gently folding them into a kitchen towel.  







Singe thinner stems (Poppies) for 10 seconds, thicker stems (Hollyhocks) for 20 seconds.  

If they begin to wilt, re-cut stem and repeat procedure. 







Hollyhocks look sensational when paired with other garden flowers. 








Don't forget to dry a few Hollyhocks in sand, 
ordinary builder's sand from your local hardware or home improvement store.  


 Have a wonderful weekend my dear friends.  

Gina 


17 comments:

  1. Wow, these bouquets are stunning! Must try your trick with the poppies ;) And thanks for your lovely comment on my blog. Will follow you along ;)

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    1. Hello Martina and welcome. Thank you for stopping by. I have enjoyed visiting your beautiful blog. I think that you will be pleased with how well this treatment works.

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  2. What gorgeous bouquets you have presented to us! I love the stem tips, too. Aren't hollyhocks fabulous summer showoffs? I so agree with you about their kind ability to share the stage with other beautiful blooms.

    Gina, I loved the pictures you showed us of the barn doors. And the space riddle was fun.

    xo

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    1. Dear Frances, Yes, Hollyhocks are wonderful flowers to us in summer bouquets. It only takes a few stalks and when combined with other summer flowers, they make quite a show. What I love most about hollyhocks is that they show up in the most unexpected places. I just have to make sure that Mr G does not run over the young seedlings with his big mower.

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  3. Replies
    1. Hello Mama Zen,
      Give it a try it really does work. Thank you for your visit, it is so appreciated.

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  4. Danke, Gina, for repeating your techniques for longer-life cut hollyhocks. I'm hoping whoever bought your peach hollyhock seeds might send you some back after this season so you will have more next year! I have deer otherwise I would have bought them and then I would have sent you some. Gorgeous bouquets!

    Mary in Oregon

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    1. Dear Mary, I don't think that deer will bother hollyhocks...they do not touch mine and I have a lot of deer visiting our garden. Why not give them a try.
      I'm still hoping that a peach hollyhock will show up in my garden. I see new areas that haven't bloomed yet.

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  5. Dear Gina,

    Wouldn't it be interesting to know the thought process of the first person who seared flower stems, and what their original aim might have been? Surely it was somebody trying to do something other than make blossoms last longer!!

    By the way, the enameled bowl in your second photograph is gorgeous! In what country did you find that treasure?

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  6. Dear Mark, Singing stems probably started with Euphorbias...they have a milky sap wihch clogs the ends and prevents water from reaching the top. I don't know what the original aim was. I'm wondering if it has anything to do with harvesting of opium poppy sap.

    The bowl is Bohemian crystal. the type still being produced. I have a pair of these bowls, a gift from a friend, many years ago.

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    1. Your suppositions on the origin of singing the stems is actually a relief, and both make perfect sense.

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  7. I just love hollyhocks, and I used to have many of them in the garden, but not anymore...I regret this!!
    However, I didn't know they keep well in a vase...I always enjoyed them in situ. And they look gorgeous in your arrangements!!!!!!!!
    I will make sure to plant some seeds again.
    Have a lovely summer!

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  8. Hello Marie Anne, Sometimes you can find little seedlings in your garden store. Maybe in your climate, in Greece, you don't have to wait 2 years to see them bloom . At least you can enjoy them the first year if you can find little plants.
    Thank you for stopping by and leaving a comment. It is so appreciated.

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  9. So much beautiful vivid color. I have absolutely enjoyed strolling through your blog as it serves as wonderful inspiration. Thank you for sharing. I do hope you will stop by and visit my blog to see some of my oil paintings, as I wish to try to return the favor. Kindest regards, Carolina Elizabeth http://carolinaelizabeth-art.blogspot.com/

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    1. Thank you Carolina Elizabeth. How nice of you to comment on my post. Thank you also for your sweet compliment. You are a wonderful artist. I will be visiting with you again.

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  10. Love the flowers. The lovely tablecloth is nearly as vibrant as the bouquets.

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    1. Hello Candy, I am so pleased that you like my flowers. I love flowers and could spend all day with them.
      I purchased the tablecloth in the Alsace many, many years ago. It has a most beautiful and complicated border. Your comment serves as a reminder to bring it out of the cupboard and use it...maybe for tomorrow's brunch. Thank you for your visit.

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