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Tuesday, April 21, 2015

French Sorrel is at its finest right now.




After several false starts...


Spring has officially arrived in our neck of the woods. 






How do I know?  It's when French Sorrel begins to grow in my garden.







Now is the time to pick the tender leaves for a delicious Spring salad. 


There is no recipe.  It's whatever is growing in the garden. Young  French Sorrel (Sauerampfer as I know it) leaves, chive blossoms, violas, nasturtium leaves, young sage leaves, horseradish blossoms and watercress from our Spring.  Balsamic vinegar and a good olive oil, sea salt and pepper to taste.  Add a few curls of Parmigiano Reggiano. 







It doesn't take long and it will go to seed. 







French Sorrel is a pretty plant in your garden and easily available in most garden shops.








Have a great week my dear 
 Friends, 

Gina 


41 comments:

  1. Gina that is the loveliest salad I've every seen - and I just know it must taste delicious! Are the purple flowers the horseradish blossoms? I'm not familiar with this French sorrel - it reminds me of young spinach - will be looking for seeds to plant for next Spring (does it only produce in Spring?).

    The jonquils are so glorious - I find I love them even more than daffodils, especially the fragrant ones. So happy Spring has finally sprung there - I know you've been waiting a while.

    Happy week, sending hugs.
    Mary

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    1. Dear Mary, You are correct, French Sorrel looks just like large Spinach leaves, but oh, the taste is so very different. Sauerampfer is the German word for the plant. And sour it is, but irresistible. The plant is a perennial. In cool climates it will produce almost all Summer. It will eventually go to seed ( I will save you some) and the leaves will be too tough to eat.
      I love my jonquil bed. It is glorious right now. I could take hundreds of pictures but don't want to bore my friends. With the cool weather it will hold a while.

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    2. Mary, The purple flowers are chive blossoms, the Horseradish flowers are the little white ones.

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  2. Dear Gina,
    gorgeous photos of flowers, tender greens and crocks.It has been a long, long time since I have tasted Sauerampfer and your salad looks so very delicious.
    Happy springtime, Sieglinde

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    1. Dear Sieglinde, When you were growing up did you go in search of Sauerampfer early in the Spring? Did you ever taster Sauerampfer Soup? When I have young children come for a visit I give them a leaf to taste. It is wonderful to watch their faces as the sourness always takes them by surprise.

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  3. I appreciate your recommendation of French Sorrel. I've seen it at a few stands at the Union Sq Farmers Market, and might just bring some home with me when I next vist the market. i also admire your no-recipe salad. It's great fun to put together colorful and delicious compositions.

    xo

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    1. Dear Frances, Next time you go to the market along with French Sorrel also look for Watercress and Asparagus. The three ingredients make a most delicious soup. Cook all ingredients in a little water until tender. Season with sea salt. That's all.

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    2. I will be on the outlook. I've bought some lovely asparagus in the past month from my usual grocery market The Fairway...like no other market, but it wasn't local. I do like the sound of that soup! xo

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    3. Gina, here's a post-farmers market update. I was shocked to see the price $9/pound for the only sorrel on offer at one stand. I am going to be patient and see what advanced spring weather might bring to the market. No sorrel for me today. (I am having some asparagus as part of tonight's supper though.)

      xo

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    4. Oh, ouch, that is a lot of money for a few leaves of sorrel.

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  4. Dear Gian,

    Yours is the most beautiful salad I've ever seen! It must almost be like eating a table's centerpiece. Your addition of Parmigiano makes it perfect for me.

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    1. Dear Mark, Salads can be so boring and most of the time I am guilty of serving them because I don't have all of the ingredients.. Spring, however, is different. All you need is a little package of mixed green seeds and in no time you have the perfect salad growing in a flower box.

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  5. Dear Gina - another sorrel lover here too - I have the red veined variety, sometimes known as 'bloody sorrel' which never fails to turn up every year for us adding interest to our salads

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    1. Dear Rosemary, I can imagine how beautiful your sorrel must be....the bright green with red stems would be such a welcome sight in springtime.

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  6. Your salad looks amazing Gina and like Rosemary above, I have the red veined sorrel. I've not added it to a salad yet for the plant is very small but I can imagine how pretty it will look tossed with some greens.
    Thanks for linking to Mosaic Monday.

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    1. Dear Judith, I wonder if the red veined sorrel has a different flavor than my green sorrel. You will soon be able to harvest your sorrel...it is a prolific grower. Thanks for hosting Mosaic Monday.

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  7. Stopping by from Mosaic Monday. I am quite curious about your lovely salad. I have never eaten sorrel, let alone see it grown. If nothing else, the salad looks very pretty. Beautiful photographs.

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    1. Hello Ann, You will be quite surprised when you have a chance to try French Sorrel. It has a most unique and startling taste. It really awakens your taste buds.

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  8. My hens love Sorrel! Given a chance they head for the Sorrel patch and raze it to the ground. I now have some Sorrel growing within the netted 'fruit cage', where I protect peas and brassicas from the Wood Pigeons, just in case the hens sneak into the veg garden in search of Sorrel.
    So, inspired by their enthusiasm, I added a generous handful of shredded Sorrel to a pan of eggs I was scrambling for my lunch - So delicious! It has become my Spring time treat. And I give a few leaves to the hens as a treat for them too.

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    Replies
    1. Hello Celia, Once my garden begins to grow our hens do not have the same freedom as they enjoy earlier in the Spring. I do grow all kinds of Greens just for our chickens. In the meantime our geese are marauding my garden and as of recently, not a tulip has survived because of the growing deer population in our little town.
      I like your recipe for scrambled eggs with French Sorrel. It will be on the breakfast menu this morning. Thank you for your visit and thank you also for leaving a comment.

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  9. Beautiful brilliant colours in your collage. This is the first time I have visited your blog and I am fascinated. See you again....

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    1. Welcome Sheila. I am so happy that you stopped by for a visit. Thank you also for your lovely compliment. It is very much much appreciated.

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  10. Hello dear Gina,
    That salad sounds so exotic ! I would love to taste it, and all from your garden. How wonderful.
    Your daffodils are exquisite ..so so beautiful. Spring has arrived in abundance with all your lovely flowers.
    Enjoy these lovely spring days Gina..
    val xx

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    1. Dear Val, I was celebrating too early. Freezing nights predicted for the next few days. But sooner or later the sun will win out.
      I am always so pleased to see you here for a visit. I know that you are enjoying your beautiful Spring weather.

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  11. These brightened my day, it's snowing again in my neck of the woods. Tom The Backroads Traveller

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    1. I'm glad you stopped by Tom. I spoke too soon...it froze again last night.

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  12. What a diversity of beauty is in your post, I've very enjoyed it.
    Have a nice time

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    1. Hello Mascha, I am so pleased that you liked my post. Color does make one feel alive.

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  13. Hiya, I remember your beautiful pots from a few years ago.

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    1. Hello Girl Friday, Thank you for your very nice comment and thank you also for visiting again.

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  14. Great photos! Yes, I will try this. Never used French Sorrel in a salad, but used to eat the leaves as a child.

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    1. Hello Villrose, I did the same...searching for Sauerampfer in the fields. It's great in salads and extra special in a soup with watercress and asparagus.

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  15. I have not heard of French Sorrel before so this post intrigues me... especially the salad ingredients. They sound exciting together. Stunning colours in your mosaic.

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  16. Hello Gemma, French Sorrel is a little bit like Dandelion greens. Not many people use them because of their intense flavors. But that is exactly why they are so special. Hope you will give them a try.
    Thank you for your very nice compliment.

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  17. So glad you are getting warmer weather and your bulbs are showing off.

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    1. Dear Theresa, More rain here and more flowers showing their pretty faces. Just the way I like it. Have a wonderful Sunday and thank you for visiting.

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  18. Gina, these are very beautiful photos of some wonderful flowers. Sorrel is very tasty and healthful. Great that it grows in your garden so you can harvest it fresh. Your pottery is wonderful too!
    Thanks for participating in Floral Friday Fotos, I look forward to your next contribution!

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    1. Thank you Nick. You must be very familiar with French Sorell. Do you grow it in your garden?
      Thank you for your visit and thank you also for your invitation.

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  19. Hello
    I have just come over from Rosemary's blog - Where Five Valleys Meet. Like Rosemary I have the red-veined sorrel but haven't got round to using it yet - shame on me. I will definitely give it a go now. Gorgeous pictures of your narcissus - sadly, mine have all gone over now - I miss them!

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    1. Hello Elaine and welcome. I know how you feel; we wait and wait for our spring flowers to bloom and then they are gone in such a short time.

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    2. Hello Elaine and welcome. I know how you feel; we wait and wait for our spring flowers to bloom and then they are gone in such a short time.

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