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Sunday, May 13, 2012

Do you know how to build a proper fence?




A fence that keeps the Charolais Bull and his Ladies inside?



We are replacing a 100-year-old fence. 





First things first.  You have to pull out the old cedar posts.
Gene's beloved Ford Jubilee tractor does a fine job of that.





They lasted more than a hundred years.





200 nine footers, new cedar posts are waiting in the wings.





Old barbed wire removed from 9 acres of fenced pasture.
That was a nasty job.





Eight rolls of "netting" and 4 rolls of barbed wire waiting to be strung.





This big guy made digging new post holes a snap.





A crew of four made quick work of setting posts.





The old fence repaired many times.




The stile Gene built for me (so I can get from one pasture to the other) will stay in place.





So I can get to my Spring to collect watercress and wild Asparagus.






The new fence, with braces and posts buried 3½ feet.
The netting (fence) is 47 inches tall.  Animals always want to reach to the other side.  So, the first barbed wire is strung only one inch above the netting. The second barbed wire is strung 4 inches above that. Now, the animals can not lean against the fence because they can't get their noses through the first layer. 





This old disk will have to stay, it's much too heavy to move.  We have tried. 







Hope the cattle will appreciate their new home.  I know that we like ours..

Have a great week my dear
Blogging Friends.


Gina



14 comments:

  1. The new fence appears to be much more substantial than the last one. Maybe it will last more than a hundred years. I think your old farrow looks very picturesque; it's certainly a time piece. And thanks for the view of your lovely house, an angle we haven't seen before.

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  2. How familiar your post is to me today Gina.

    Its always a big job renewing the fences.
    The view from your fields is so beautiful.. you can see the mountains .. What is the name of the range!
    A beautiful photo of your home.. surrounded with such beauty.
    Good luck with the finalisation of the fencing. I renewed mine some 8 years ago.
    Happy sunday.. val

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  3. Please can I have Gene's tractor?! :)) Quite wonderful!
    Your house looks beautiful Gina and just look at all that space for you are your your charolais
    best wishes
    Sharon
    xx

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  4. your home is lovely and the mountain view is beautiful.your blog is one of the favorites of mine in the blog world.

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  5. So glad we sold our cattle during the drought last year! Fences are not as pressing as they were in the past. I love the new look of the cedar posts...they are artistic in design.

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  6. Gina, this has given me some insight into replacing our falling down split rail fences. They need redoing desperately, but this year we are focusing on the interior! The rustic cedar posts look great...and the view of your lovely home, in the distance post card worthy! I often wish for a tractor, so I can literally take things into my own hands....I have done so much hands on work in my own garden....it is very rewarding.....this post was very informative as well as beautiful . N.xo

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  7. Dear Mark, The boys built a good and strong fence. But the work is never done. Another fence needs attention. We'll take a breather first. This one should last long after we're gone. I took the picture of our house as I was coming back from the fields. It is the west elevation or the back of the house looking towards our pond. The other buildings are all to the east or the front of the house.

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  8. Dear Val, The mountain range you see is called "Skyline Drive" with an elevation of 11,000 feet. The most prominent features are big and little Horseshoe Mountain. Skyline Drive is known for its beautiful scenery and pristine wildlife and flora and fauna.
    The fence is completed. Good money spent well, I think.

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  9. Dear Sharon, Gene would sell his wife before he would give up his beloved tractor. It is the workhorse around this property. We thank our lucky stars every day for having made the decision to move to the country and the wide open spaces.

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  10. Dear Meme, that is a very lovely compliment. I thank you. Have a great week.

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  11. Dear Theresa, Sad to hear about your drought and having to sell your cattle. This growing season looks a bit uncertain for us. We have not had enough snow this past winter. I'm afraid that we are heading for the next 5 year dry cycle, as we have experienced in the past.

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  12. Dear Nella, Getting involved in your garden is very rewarding. I know all about having to let some jobs wait for another year. The work around here is never done. We have learned to let go and take time out now and then.

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  13. you live in a beautiful place! and you have a wonderful new fence! thank you for sharing this at good fences!

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    Replies
    1. Hello TexWisGirl, The best part about our new fence is that we don't have to wrestle with the bull and cows to get them back into the enclosure. The old fence had to be replaced.
      Thank you for stopping by. It is so appreciated.

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