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Friday, April 27, 2012

Not just another Tulip





This is The Rembrandt Tulip



Growing in my garden right now.







When arranged en masse you can't ignore them.






This is the exotic looking, highly sought-after Rembrandt Tulip.






Tulips were first introduced to Europe from Turkey
during the Dutch Golden Age (1568-1648).
By 1637 Tulip Mania was in full swing. 





More and more exotic looking tulips were being propagated.  They became the Collectors prized possession.  However,  the unusual stripes were caused by a virus, a type of Tulip specific virus, the mosaic virus.





A virus that could potentially destroy the Tulip culture in Holland and possibly the entire Dutch economy.





During Tulip Mania one tulip bulb could cost as much as a House.
That is why some tulip bulbs were ensconced in chicken wire cages and hung from the ceiling during winter months.

 




That is what I should be doing.  Moles, Voles, Mice and other critters are feasting on mine every winter.






But they don't eat my daffodils, they're poisonous.






Have a great weekend my dear
Blogging Friends.

Gina





25 comments:

  1. I've read several accounts of the Dutch Tulip Mania, always a surreal period to my mind (this from a button collector!). But seeing your Rembrandt Tulips, I can understand how that could have happened. I've always loved varigated flowers, and that mixture of light green veining with the other pastels is truly superb!

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  2. Dear Gina - what a lovely post - the colours are so magical.
    There is a National Trust property near to where I live that have planted 21,000 tulips and I keep meaning to go and see them if I have time. The house, called Dyrham Park, has a collection of original Delft Tulip vases that were especially made to hold the flowers in the 1680-1690s.

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  3. Dear Gina. These are the most magnificent tulips. What stunning photos you have taken of them.
    I was on skype this morning with one of my girlfriends.. She is Dutch. We were talking about bulbs and plants and so on.
    Tulips came into the conversation. Then she proceeded to tell me that the Tulips came from Turkey. I was amazed. I learnt something today.
    I have always called this a "Parrot tulip".. now I know its name The Rembrand Tulip.
    Thank you so much.
    Happy Friday
    val.

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  4. Dear Mark, Yes, so strange that an entire population can go nutty over a flower. Possibly, it had something to do with a new class of citizens, the Bürger, made wealthy by Holland's superiority on the Seas.

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  5. Dear Val, Taking photographs of these wonderful flowers was a lot of fun. They are such good models. The original tulips, from Turkey, were either red or yellow. That is why some tulips revert back to those colors after a few years. Originally they grew at high altitudes providing food for goats and other grazing animals. The Parrot tulip looks quite similar but without some of the many stripes of the Rembrandt tulip.

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  6. Dear Rosemay, What a sight that must be, 21,000 tulips all in one place. I would love to see your photos when you can take the time to visit. I'm also intrigued by the Delft Tulip Vases. I've been watching ebay to see if I can afford one or two of those lovely designs.

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    1. Dear Gina - I do believe that you can get reproductions of tulip vases. The real ones cost about £50,000! Have a look at http://nttreasurehunt.wordpress.com/category/gloucestershire/ where you can see some of the vases at Dryham Park. Each little funnel shape held a single tulip.

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  7. Dear Gina, I have always thought these were parrot tulips as well, I too have learned something...your photos are stunning! The colors are so lovely....whatever bulbs I have planted over the years have been winter food for the squirrels! Last year I was given white tulips from Holland, and I watched as the squirrels dug them out of my pots ( thinking they would not find them there!! ) almost instantly... I have sent an email regarding the lovely platter you are designing for me....N.xo

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  8. Gina..those might be the most beautiful tulip pictures I have ever seen!!!!! The colors are outrageous and I can only imagine how exquisite they must be in person! Enjoy them...stunning!

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  9. Gina, I adore Tulips and these are absolutely Gorgeous, I love the way you photographed their beauty to share~

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  10. Tulip time is such an exuberant part of each springtime. It's just about now that I redouble my wish to have another gardening experience.

    Meanwhile, it's grand to vicariously experience this abundance of color and shape via places like your very beautiful site, Gina. I can absolutely understand that historic tulip mania time.

    xo

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  11. Well, now I will have to try these, for sure! Tulips are my most favorite flower... But they are a little trickier to grow here in the South, than up North. I keep trying.... And will attempt these next year! Just stunning.

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  12. Such breathtaking photos! Thank you for sharing.

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  13. Dear Rosemary, Oh, I wish, I could afford such beautiful examples. Thank you for making me aware of this very interesting blog. Happy Sunday.x, Gina

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  14. Dear Nella, It is frustrating to have animals come by and raid your flowers and negate all of your hard work. You could try placing wire cages over your pots and remove them when they start growing in the spring. Happy Sunday to you and yours. ox, Gina

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  15. Dear Tina, I'm not surprised that you like these special Tulips. I can see them in your beautiful new surroundings. Rembrandt Tulips are not difficult to find in the Fall. They should do well in your climate. Happy Sunday. ox, Gina

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  16. Hi Mary, I don't know if tulips will grow in your area but these particular tulips are worth giving them a try.

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  17. Dear Frances, Maybe a few tulip bulbs in pots could be your next gardening experience. There must be a way for I know that you would love to grow some of these beauties. ox, Gina

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  18. Hello Eye for Detail. Thank you for your visit. Have you tried placing tulip bulbs in your refrigerator for 6 weeks and then planting them in pots?

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  19. Hello Scribbler and welcome. It is obvious (from your blog) that you like flowers. Thank you for your lovely compliment. Gina

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  20. Gina, I think these are the most exquisite tulips I've ever seen. I'm going to ask to see if the local resource can order these. I love the mix of color and the ruffled edges. I like to grow tulips in pots here in TX. I seem to have better luck.

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  21. Extraordiary tulips,I wonder how I get hold of some of these bulbs. If the cost matches the beauty I think I would be in trouble. Love the history on the gorgeous tulip.
    Ann

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  22. Dear Sarah and dear Ann, These gorgeous Tulip bulbs came in several sacks from Costco. Look for them in the Fall. I know I will be looking for more.

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  23. Beautiful images Gina, and so glad they don't eat daffodils.

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  24. Such amazing tulips! Absolutely gorgeous. Thank you for being a part of Seasonal Sundays.

    - The Tablescaper

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